31 Mar 2017
31 Mar 2017

Alert, Canada


Earth observation image of the week: a Sentinel-1 radar image of Ellesmere Island in the Canadian Arctic, also featured on the Earth from Space video programme
Source: ESA news

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30 Mar 2017

ATV-3 docking


Operations image of the week: Mission controllers monitoring the approach and docking of ATV Edoardo Amaldi with the International Space Station this week in 2012
Source: ESA news

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29 Mar 2017
29 Mar 2017

ASITV: In search of lost probes

Video transcript – Using a radar “eye” to track down lost probes from Earth. Finding abandoned space vehicles floating in anarchic orbits, or dangerous junk wandering aimlessly, is definitely an interesting technological challenge. And while it may be difficult to pick up clues about the position of retired missions around our own planet, it is that much harder if they’re lost around the Moon.

English

Source: ASI news

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29 Mar 2017

ASITV: Stardust at the dawn of the universe

Video transcript – Stardust in the infant universe. The Chilean ESO ALMA observatory has focussed on a distant, young galaxy, full of…interstellar dust, seen by exploiting the gravitational lens effect. The galaxy is named A2744_YD4, and is the most distant group of stars ever seen by the ALMA telescope.

English

Source: ASI news

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29 Mar 2017
28 Mar 2017

Final two ExoMars landing sites chosen

Two ancient sites on Mars that hosted an abundance of water in the planet’s early history have been recommended as the final candidates for the landing site of the 2020 ExoMars rover and surface science platform: Oxia Planum and Mawrth Vallis.

Source: ESA news

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28 Mar 2017

The electric sands of Titan

Experiments led by researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology suggest the particles that cover the surface of Saturn’s largest moon, Titan, are “electrically charged.” When the wind blows hard enough Titan’s non-silicate granules get kicked up and start to hop in a motion referred to as saltation.

English

Source: ASI news

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28 Mar 2017

Hide and seek between the rings

What appears as a pair of bright dashes at the center of this image is one of the features rings scientists have dubbed “propellers”. This particular propeller, named Bleriot, marks the presence of a body that is much larger than the particles that surround it, yet too small to clear out a complete gap in the rings (like Pan and Daphnis) and become a moon in its own right.

English

Source: ASI news

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